Street Art: The Russian Mafia State in Hungary

You know all the things I write about on my blog, sometimes I feel I’m a little lost in my own thoughts. But then I came across one of the prolific billboards in my neighborhood before and after the April 6th elections. As you can see from the photos someone else in the neighborhood feels the need to publicly express themselves. I think it is important to deconstruct what the street artist is saying here.

Here in the first photo, taken before the elections, you see the artist is expressing the often used phrase ‘Mafia State’ used to describe how Hungary’s Prime Minister has built a very ‘corporatist’ state. Or rather, the intermingling of state and business.

The word ‘Maffia’ here may also  imply the use of force or coercion if a citizen does not comply with the ruling oligarchs or party line of thinking. While it is normal for the state to use force to enforce order, here we have also a reference to financial means to maintain order. For example, if one is aware of the huge amount of advertising in the Fidesz campaign in Budapest, one may observe other money was used besides that allocated by the state and political parties for financing their campaigns. Also, all the many companies the state has nationalized or bought out over the wishes of its owners, then these could be interpreted as mafia-like actions.

Later, the “Maffia” was painted over.

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However, in the next photo taken on April 10th, after the election, you see the street artist is expressing an even stronger opinion of Hungary’s tie to Russia. Here it is the ‘Russian Mafia’. No doubt this is reference to the many economic and ideological ties the government holds with Russia. The need is now greater than ever for Orban to promote the Russian line in the EU.  The recent Paks deal with the Russians, means Fidesz must serve the Russians. Period.  This leads the artist here to imply Fidesz is a tool of the Russian Mafia State. Often comparisons are drawn between Orban’s governing style and that of Russia’s Putin.  Just today, the government is attacking the Norwegian Fund, as privately financed social activities, which the Hungarian state wants to control. A line out of Putin’s playbook. In our interpretation of the graffiti here, the artist may also be making this statement that Fidesz and Putin are mafia brothers.

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All in all, it is encouraging to see public art work in Budapest which is not all state sanctioned.